Review: The Werebear’s Unwanted Wife by Marina Maddix

May Contain Spoilers

I had so many hopes for The Werebear’s Unwanted Wife, but it failed to meet most of my expectations. Most of my disappointment can be laid purely at the feet of Alex, the hero. He has been promised to the daughter of the Hamilton werebear clan since he was a child. He’s not happy that he has to sacrifice his future to put an end to generations of war between their clans, but his dad browbeats him into going along with the plan. He keeps wondering why he’s never heard anything about his bride to be, or seen her picture, so he sums it up to her being hideously unattractive. Obviously there is something wrong with her. And right there I thought – dude, you are a complete and utter jerk.

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Review: The Werewolf Tycoon’s Baby by Celia Kyle


May Contain Spoilers

So, these Howls Romances are basically series romance with paranormal characters. I’ve read three so far, to mixed results. All of the heroes were shifters, and that’s fine because I am on a shifter kick, thanks to Kate Daniels and Kitty Norville. I am eating up PNR as fast as I can check out titles, too. I haven’t gone through a PNR or UF phase in a long, long time, so I guess I was about due. Read more

Review: Lure of the Dragon by Anna Lowe

May Contain Spoilers

I have been struggling to finish a book recently. This happens every few months; I begin to feel overwhelmed by Real Life, and I’d rather mindlessly play Crafty Candy than try to concentrate on something to read. When this happens, I usually shift gears to shorter romance, and since I’m in the mood for shifters, I grabbed Lure of the Dragon when it popped up on KU. The promise of balmy island breezes, sandy beaches, and dragons had me hooked.

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Review: Tangle of Need by Nalini Singh

May Contain Spoilers

I am trying to power through the last books in this series, so I’m ready for Silver Silence in June.  The library is not cooperating.  I think most of the other patrons are doing the same thing, based on the waiting lists!  I am still glad that I discovered the Psy-Changleing series so late, because it’s been fun grabbing a volume here and there, instead of having to wait a year between books for them to be published.  I won’t be saying that much longer, though.

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Review: Etched in Bone by Anne Bishop

May Contain Spoilers

I love this series, and have been eagerly awaiting the final installment.  Real Life kept getting in the way of reading my eArc, however, but I finally found a chunk of time to set aside to do nothing but read Etched in Bone.  This was everything I had hoped for and more.  I was left with happy tingles by the end, and getting there was an adventure with all of the residents of the Courtyard. When Meg encounters danger, she isn’t a passive victim, but instead takes control of her own rescue.  She has grown a lot, and Simon, the growly Wolf, has also been changed from his interactions with the young blood prophet.

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Guest Post: NJ Walters, Author of Wolf in His Heart

This morning I have a guest post from N. J. Walters, author of the Salvation Pack series!

How did you come up with the idea for this story?

Sage Gallagher was first introduced in Wolf on a Mission, but he was still a teenager. I knew when I was writing that book that Sage, and his twin brother Reece, would need to have their own stories. There was no way I could let them go without knowing what happened to them. So Wolf in his Heart jumps forward a decade, allowing both of them to grow up and become the men they were meant to be. Sage is quiet and thoughtful. He is like a werewolf in all ways except for one major one—he can’t shift.

The idea for this story came from Sage and Rina themselves. I don’t know if most non-writers can understand, but the characters tell me their stories. Once I knew both of them and understood the unique challenges they were facing the story flowed from there.

Where do you find your inspiration?

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Review and Giveaway: City of Light by Keri Arthur

 

May Contain Spoilers

Review:

I am a big fan of Keri Arthur’s Souls of Fire series, so I was excited to check out City of Light.  This is the start of her Outcast series, which has a futuristic, post-apocalyptic feel.  The main character is a déchet, an artificially conceived super-solider with both shifter and vampire DNA, and she’s been trained to seduce enemy shifters to divulge their deepest secrets.  She can alter her image, she’s immune to poison, and she can talk to ghosts.  She’s also pretty kick ass in a fight, and can better than hold her own in most instances.  She has one major weakness, and it’s almost her downfall several times during the story.  Tiger was in charge of the nursery in one of the déchet bunkers, and after the shifters won the war and attempted to eradicate all traces of her kind, she was forced to watch all of her young charges, as well as every other individual in the bunker, die horrible deaths when toxins were pumped into the structure.  When she learns that a child is in danger, she drops everything to save her and ends up leaping from the frying pan into the fire.

It’s been over a hundred years since the end of the war, and Tiger has spent most of that time hiding in the bunker.  The shifters dumped cement into the bunker to permanently seal it off, but luckily for Tiger, it only filled the top levels, leaving the rest of the structure intact.  There are secret entrances that she makes use of to steal in and out of her home, which is populated with the ghosts of her young wards, as well as the deceased warriors that inhabited the lower levels.  This was one of the largest plot holes for me, because it make zero sense that the victors of the war would completely overlook the fact that the military bunker had more ways in than the ones they sealed.  Especially when it was so close to their city.  They were so confident that they killed everyone in the bunker that it was inconceivable to them that someone actually survived.  With all of the times Tiger entered and exited her home, it was inconceivable to me that nobody noticed.

After the shifters dropped bombs to end the war, their weapons tore rifts between this world and the next, letting in monsters more terrifying than those they fought during the war.  Now blood-thirsty monsters dominate the night, causing the city dwellers to live under perpetual artificial light. Not only do the humans and shifters have to worry about vampires, but the Others from beyond the rifts also hunt during the night.  It’s during a monster infested night that Tiger’s ghosts send her out into the darkness.  There is a child out there, unprotected, soon to be a snack for the vampires.  Without a second thought, Tiger races out to save her, and also finds an injured ranger, a shifter that specialized in the murder of déchets.  Tiger manages to save both of them, and turns her quiet life on its ear.

There’s a lot of action and near death episodes in City of Light, and that kept me engaged in the story.  Tiger can’t trust anyone – not her new acquaintances, not an old friend she’s been reunited with.  There’s something off about everyone, some darkness she can’t quite place her finger on.  When she learns that someone is kidnapping young children for unknown, but most assuredly nefarious purposes, she begins to suspect government ties to the crimes.  With time running our, she knows she only has herself and her ghosts to rely on.

I thought some of the world building was a little weak.  I didn’t think this post-war world was sufficiently fleshed out, especially when it came to the government structure and the ruling hierarchy.  Some of the supporting characters also felt flat and one-dimensional.  The lead up to a few of the action sequences seemed drawn out, leaving me to hope that the battles would soon begin.  These are typical gripes I have at the start of a new series, and I’m hoping some of my concerns will be expanded on later in the series.  I did enjoy the book, and I’m looking forward to the next title in the Outcast series. 

Grade:  B

Review copy provided by Publisher

The first in an all-new futuristic fantasy series from Keri Arthur—the New York Times bestselling author of the Souls of Fire novels.

When the bombs that stopped the species war tore holes in the veil between this world and the next, they allowed entry to the Others—demons, wraiths, and death spirits who turned the shadows into their hunting grounds. Now, a hundred years later, humans and shifters alike live in artificially lit cities designed to keep the darkness at bay….

As a déchet—a breed of humanoid super-soldiers almost eradicated by the war—Tiger has spent her life in hiding. But when she risks her life to save a little girl on the outskirts of Central City, she discovers that the child is one of many abducted in broad daylight by a wraith-like being—an impossibility with dangerous implications for everyone on earth.

Because if the light is no longer enough to protect them, nowhere is safe…

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Review: Moon Called by Patricia Briggs

May Contain Spoilers

Review:

I’m late to the Mercy Thompson band wagon.  I don’t know why I avoided the series, but I just didn’t find them appealing, despite the kickbutt covers.  Then I started reading the Alpha and Omega series, and I decided to give them a chance.  I think a big stumbling block for me was the 1st person POV, which isn’t my favorite (I am learning to appreciate it, though).  However, after listening to part of the audio book, I jumped to an ebook copy during last week’s marathon of pre-surgical appointments.  The audio book was very entertaining, but not practical to listen to in either the doctor’s office or the hospital, and that is the only reason I switched versions.  I highly recommend the audio book if that is your preferred reading method.

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