Manga Review: Witchcraft Works Vol 1 by Ryu Mizunagi

May Contain Spoilers

What did I just read??  What a weird book.  The first chapter is just bizarre.  Takamiya is just an average guy.  His classmate, Kagari, is known at school as “Princess.”  She is smart, beautiful, graceful, and has her own fan club.  For some reason she keeps sitting by Takamiya.  They are always on class duty together.  She rides the same bus he does.  All of this gets him into hot water with Kagari’s fan club, whose members are fiercely jealous and protective of their idol.

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Manga Review: Flying Witch 1 by Chihiro Ishizuka

May Contain Spoilers

Since Poppy had her ligament surgery, I have been having a very hard time concentrating on anything.  I have spent hours playing Mystery Match and Crafty Candy because they require little thought.  Just match the blocks and you’re good to go.  When that got boring, I turned to my mountain of neglected manga and pulled out a few random volumes to read while waiting for her stitches and her bones to heal.

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Manga Review: The Gods Lie by Kaori Ozaki

May Contain Spoilers

When I started this, I thought that I would hate it.  It was pretty weird when Natsuru was grabbing his mom’s boobs.  Their entire relationship took a while to get used to, and even though it’s obvious that they are close, I just don’t know. I guess you have to have a few boob references since it is a boys’ comic, but, yuck.

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Review: Fullmetal Alchemist #3 by Hiromu Arakawa


Contains Spoilers

Edward, Al, and Armstrong are on their way to the boys’ hometown so Ed’s auto-mail can be repaired after his arm was destroyed in the fight with Scar. I enjoyed this lull in the tense drama of the series. Their hometown is isolated and idyllic. Pinako and Winry helped them after they dabbled into forbidden alchemy, and it’s obvious that there is a great deal of affection between all of them. These chapters are also a great opportunity to catch your breath, because the rest of the volume is one shocking revelation after another, followed by lengthy fight sequences.

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Review: Fullmetal Alchemist #2 by Hiromu Arakawa

May Contain Spoilers

As Edward and Al continue their quest to get their original bodies back, they encounter danger, and see how far a desperate alchemist will go to keep his license.

This volume broadens the examination of the dark side of alchemy and the theory of equivalent exchange. What is the life of young girl worth, when her father has run out of options in his research? When he does the unthinkable, Edward realizes how close to the edge of darkness he came during his efforts to perform forbidden alchemy. Does it matter that he only wanted to see his mother again? When you look at what he lost, his brother’s body, as well as his arm and leg, for what he got, a lump of flesh that couldn’t even be called human, the price seems steep indeed. The whole system is rigged to so that the truly power hungry are willing to sacrifice the unthinkable to bend the rules. Alchemy can do so much good, but in the hands of the wrong person, it can corrupt absolutely.

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Review: Fullmetal Alchemist by Hiromu Arakawa

 

May Contain Spoilers

I am rereading these; I don’t think I ever finished reading the series. Grabbed the first 9 volumes at the library (it was easier than digging through boxes to find my copies!). I love the concept of equivalent exchange and that magic has a cost. In order to get something through magic, you must be able to sacrifice something equally as valuable. When Ed and Al try to bring their mother back from the dead, their sacrifice isn’t nearly enough to revive her. Al loses his body, and Edward loses a leg. In order to get his brother back, Edward must sacrifice his arm; all he gets in return is Al’s soul, which he bonds to an empty suit of armor.

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Manga Review: A Wife of Convenience by Yoshiko Hanatsu & Kim Lawrence

May Contain Spoilers

Despite some initial confusion with the story, as well as a few questions about word choices used in the translation, A Wife of Convenience was a pretty entertaining read.  At first I hated the cover, but Rosie’s slightly overwhelmed expression perfectly reflects her state of mind during the first part of the story.  This has a couple tropes I enjoy despite myself.  There’s twin sisters swapping places, the hero’s family is filled to the brim with selfish losers who try to meddle in their lives, and a marriage of convenience to keep the family business out of the hands of said selfish losers.

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