[PR] Amazon Announces Kindle Unlimited

Amazon announced a new subscription based lending program available for the Kindle and Kindle Apps.  Kindle Unlimited looks pretty promising; for $9.99 per month, you can read as many books as you want.  This differs from the one free borrow per month available to Prime members.  Amazon’s imprints (Montlake Romance, 47North, etc) are included, as well as titles from Open Road Media, Kensington, Scholastic, and other smaller pubs.  Bella Andre’s books are included, so if you’re curious to read her stuff, you can gobble them all up for $9.99 per month.  This only available in the US currently.  There’s also a large audio book library so you can take your stories on the go.

I plan on trying out Kindle Unlimited soon (as soon as I have a couple free weekends in a row!).  The first 30 days are free, and you can cancel at any time. 

What do you think Amazon’s Kindle Unlimited?  Will you try it out?  If some of my favorite publishers, like Entangled and Harlequin were included, I would be signing up in a nanosecond instead of waiting.  I’m curious to see who else they get on board.

The full press release follows:

Amazon.com has added a news release to its Media Room website.

Title: Introducing Kindle Unlimited: Unlimited Reading and Listening on Any Device–Just $9.99 a Month
Date(s): 18-Jul-2014 7:30 AM
For a complete listing of our news releases, please click here

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YA Deals for Your Kindle!

Here’s a small round-up of nicely priced YA eBooks for your Kindle or Kindle app.

The Good Braider  by Terry Farish ($1.99) I purchased this one, and hope to read it this weekend.

In spare free verse laced with unforgettable images, Viola’s strikingly original voice sings out the story of her family’s journey from war-torn Sudan, to Cairo, and finally to Portland, Maine. Here, in the sometimes too close embrace of the local Southern Sudanese Community, she dreams of South Sudan while she tries to navigate the strange world of America – a world where a girl can wear a short skirt, get a tattoo or even date a boy; a world that puts her into sharp conflict with her traditional mother who, like Viola, is struggling to braid together the strands of a displaced life. Terry Farish’s haunting novel is not only a riveting story of escape and survival, but the universal tale of a young immigrant’s struggle to build a life on the cusp of two cultures.

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Bone Worship: A Novel by Elizabeth Elsami   ($2.99)  I haven’t heard of this book before, but it looks intriguing.  There are some positive reviews, and a few that are less than glowing.  Maybe download a sample chapter before purchasing.

A rich and soul-searching novel about an Iranian-American girl whose enigmatic father has decided to arrange her marriage

Jasmine Fahroodhi’s Iranian father has always fascinated her. With his strange habits and shrouded past, she cannot fathom how he ended up marrying her prim American mother, although lately it seems that love in general is just as incomprehensible.

Failing out of school just shy of graduation after a disastrous romance sends her into a tailspin, a conflicted Jasmine returns home without any idea where her life is headed.

Her father has at least one idea: he has plans for a hastegar, an arranged marriage, between Jasmine and whatever man he sees fit. Confused, furious, yet intrigued, Jasmine meets suitor after suitor with increasingly disastrous, and humorous, results. Only when she begins to open herself up to the mysteries of familial and romantic love does Jasmine discover the truth about her evasive father—and the depths of her own strength—in Elizabeth Eslami’s highly original and striking debut novel.

 

The Boy at the End of the World by Greg Van Eekhout ($1.99) – I loved this Middle Grade read!  Set in a post-apocalyptic world, it has lots of action and adventure, and I loved Fisher.

This is what he knew:

His name was Fisher.

The world was dangerous.

And he was alone.

Fisher is the last boy on Earth – and things are not looking good for the human race. The carefully crafted survival dome where Fisher and dozens of other humans have been sleeping for millenia has been destroyed. Through a lucky accident, only Fisher survived.

The world Fisher wakes up in is a lot like ours – but it’s changed, too. After the human race wiped itself out, nature took over, and wild creatures evolved into barely familiar beasts. Fisher must face them all as they set off on a journey that seems hopeless – at first. Then Fisher uncovers evidence that there may be a second survival dome far to the west. What was once a struggle for one boy’s survival becomes a journey of hope.

With a broken robot and a friendly mammoth as his only companions, Fisher heads West. But something is watching them… something that wants to find the second survival dome just as badly as they do.

 

 

Storm (Elemental)  by Brigid Kemmerer  ($4.50)  This PNR has been garnering terrific reviews.  It’s in my TBR, but I haven’t gotten to it yet.

Becca Chandler is suddenly getting all the guys– the ones she doesn’t want. Ever since her ex-boyfriend spread those lies about her.

Then she saves Chris Merrick from a beating in the school parking lot. Chris is different. Way different: he can control water–just like his brothers can control fire, wind, and earth. They’re powerful. Dangerous. Marked for death.

And now that she knows the truth, so is Becca.

Secrets are hard to keep when your life’s at stake. When Hunter, the mysterious new kid around school, turns up with a talent for being in the wrong place at the right time, Becca thinks she can trust him. But then Hunter goes head-to-head with Chris, and Becca wonders who’s hiding the most dangerous truth of all.

The storm is coming. . .