Manga Review: Wandering Island V 1 by Kenji Tsuruta


May Contain Spoilers

I noticed this title on the library’s catalog website and put in a request for a network library to send it to my library. I love this service, and if you are a huge library fan and you aren’t taking advantage of the Holds system, I highly recommend that you do so. I put in a request on Monday and had the book by the weekend. When I return it, an interlibrary van returns it to the lending library. I am so grateful that several libraries in our network have well-stocked manga collections!

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Manga Review: Bakuman V 3 by Tsugumi Ohba & Takeshi Obata @shonenjump


May Contain Spoilers

I am finally gaining some traction with Bakuman. Volume 3 was the best so far, mainly because of Eiji. The genius manga creator is shockingly unique, and I really enjoy his personality. He is so lost in his stories that he doesn’t even notice the real world, taking extended visits into his vivid imagination. While I thought he was going to be conceited jerk, he was far from it in this volume. He’s just a comic geek, magnified by 100, and he doesn’t have the best social graces. Then again, neither do Moritaka and Akito.

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Review: A Girl Like That by Tanaz Bhathena


May Contain Spoilers

This is a hard book to review without giving out a lot of spoilers, but I’m going to try my best. I was initially attracted to the book because of the setting, and the premise sounded intriguing. Was Zarin really a troublemaker, a deviant girl who leads her schoolmates astray? How did she and Porus end up in the deadly accident? Just bad luck? Someone looking to get back at her for some slight? Once I picked it up, I found it compelling and hard to put down. Did I like it, though? I don’t know. This is a hard book to like, because when I finished it, I like I had been fed through a wringer.

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Manga Review: Bakuman V 2 by Tsugumi Ohba & Takeshi Obata @shonenjump


May Contain Spoilers

I still don’t know how I feel about this manga series about creating manga. On the one hand, it can be interesting when Moritaka and Akito meet with their editor and go over their game plan for making it big in the manga biz. On the other, brainstorming their next project and the creative process just isn’t all that interesting. Throw in a very awkward romance, and I’m still undecided about this series.

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Manga Review: I Hear the Sunspot by Yuki Fumino


May Contain Spoilers

This was a quiet little gem. Taichi is a college student, and he’s drifting through life. Raised by his grandfather, money has always been tight. Taichi has a bit of a temper, and he isn’t afraid to defend himself or others should the need arise. He has been working low wage jobs to help feed himself, and suddenly finds himself at loose ends. When Kohei, a student who has a hearing disability, offers to give him lunch boxes in exchange for help taking notes in class, Taichi thinks he’s died and gone to heaven. Kohei’s lunches are delish, and now Taichi has an excuse to go to class.

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Manga Review: Bakuman V 1 by Tsugumi Ohba &Takeshi Obata


May Contain Spoilers

The library is slowly adding manga to their digital catalog, so I have been borrowing random volumes in hopes that they will keep adding more to the catalog. I was interested in Bakuman because I enjoyed previous series by both creators, and I think the cover is visually appealing. I’m not sure how I feel about this one yet, though.

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Review: Divided We Fall by Trent Reedy



May Contain Spoilers

I listened to the audio book until the last three chapters, which I read as quickly as I could. Overall, this was a very engaging book, exploring how horribly political unrest can escalate. I decided to give it a listen because it is frightening plausible – in Divided We Fall, a new ID law that the president signed into law is the catalyst for a rapidly unstable political landscape.

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Review: The Alice Network by Kate Quinn

 

May Contain Spoilers

Quick Take:

War is hell is my biggest takeaway from this read.  I thought that pacing was uneven, especially after the halfway point.  The chapters alternated between WWI France and two years after the end of WWII.  Every character is suffering from PTSD, and I liked that Charlie, Finn, and Eve, each barely functional prior to an unlikely meeting, propped each other up and gave each other the emotional support they needed.  While they don’t necessarily get a HEA, they get an I’m not going to blow my brains out in utter despair ending, and considering what Eve and Finn saw during the wars, that meant a lot.

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